Total Quality Management

March 23, 2010

Some Images of 5S Houskeeping in Factories

Filed under: Toyota Production System — Tags: , , , , , , — Nameer @ 8:10 am

There are number of websites on internet that explain the concept of 5S Housekeeing. I have collected and uploaded selected images here so that concept could be understood easily.  Here they are: (more…)

October 22, 2009

Some Video Clips About 5S

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Nameer @ 5:45 pm

I have found few clips of 5S that are mostly education or promotional in nature. However,  by watching these clips one can have some idea about how 5S activities are done in industrial setting.  If anyone finds a clip showing 5S in office environment, please do forward its link to me so that I could add the same on this post. (more…)

April 19, 2009

5S in Toyota Motor Corporation

Here are few images taken from Toyota Motor Corporation that explain how this great organization follows principles of 5S in their factories and offices:
5S in Engine Assembly Plant

5S in Engine Assembly Plant

 

Place for everything and everything in its place

Place for everything and everything in its place

 

Cleanliness is the cornerstone of 5S philosophy

Cleanliness is the cornerstone of 5S philosophy

 

The 5S Culture in Office Setting

An example of perfect sorting

An example of perfect sorting

 

.

.

 

.

.

 

.

.

 

.

.

 

.

.

 

.

.

 

An aerial view of one of the many plants of Toyota Motor Corporation

An aerial view of one of the many plants of Toyota Motor Corporation

Credit: Special thanks to Mr.Salman Raja and his TQM group for sending me these lovely images that remind me of my wounderful days in Toyota Motor Corporation when I stayed in Tokyo, Nagoya and Osaka on my training assignment.

October 28, 2008

Lean Production System

Lean production system is the western term for Toyota Production System. This production philosophy is now widely used in auto industry around the world. This system has been modified everywhere in the auto industry, adapted to some extent on the local industrial situation or practices, however its core principles remain the same. This system is not only used in auto industry but also in other non-auto industries involved in assembling process.

In order to understand lean production system, it is important to understand it in its historical perspective first.  If we study the history of automobile industry, it can be separated in three eras, which can be termed as milestones of automobile industry. These milestones are:

  1. Invention of Automobile (1880)
  2. The Henry Ford’s Mass Production System (1910)
  3. The Toyota or Lean Production System (1933)

1. Invention of Automobile in 1880

Gotlib Daimler

Carl Benz

Auto-historians give credit of invention of auto vehicle to two inventors who were contemporaries and almost simultaneously invented the automobile.

Their names were Gotlib Daimler and Karl Benz. However, Carl Benz is generally given credit to develop world’s first automobile in 1885. Both of them were Germans and later their companies were merged, in 1926, to appear as one of the greatest names in automobile Industry, called Daimler Benze-AG. Other contemporaries were Wilhelm Maybach and Seigfried Marcus who were also known for developing automobile later during the same period.

Replica of the Benz Patent Motorwagen built in 1886

Replica of the Benz Patent Motorwagen built in 1886

2. Henry Ford’s Mass Production System

Henry Ford

picture2

Henry Ford with his famous Model T Car

In 1910 Henry Ford laid the foundation of first highly organized assembly line system of automobile manufacturing. He organized all the elements of a manufacturing system-people, machines, tooling, and products– and arranged them in a continuous system called conveyor belt system.

Ford was so incredibly successful that he quickly became one of the world’s richest men and put the world on wheels.

Ford Motor Company also assembled  aircraft using mass production techniques.  This mass production success was known as “A-Bomber an Hour” production during WWII when Henry Ford, upon request from US government, produced bomber air crafts for USAF. Before Henry Ford’s take over, the same plant was producing only one bomber a day. (more…)

The WordPress Classic Theme. Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 104 other followers